Header graphic for print
Banking & Finance Law Report

Tag Archives: payment

Default by a Customer: Knowledge is Power

Posted in Bank Lending

This article is Part Three in a seven-part series on how to structure sales and what to do when your customer fails to pay. You can find previous article in this series here: Structuring Sales to Ensure Payment, Signs of Trouble Before Payment Default. Please subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the box on the left, or check back weekly for additional articles in the series.

By understanding your position prior to or shortly after a default by the customer, it may be possible to negotiate favorable terms with the customer to avoid default, proceed with litigation against the customer before there is a deluge or prepare for a bankruptcy by the customer. To identify your options and rights as a vendor you must first determine the following:

1.      Default provisions;

2.      Default notice requirements;

3.      Permitted interest, late charges and attorney fees;

4.      The existence of guaranties (corporate or individual);

5.      Existing or potential collateral and available equity; and

6.      Where you would need to sue, i.e., jurisdiction. 


Continue Reading →

Signs of Trouble Before Payment Default

Posted in Bank Lending, Bank Litigation, Bankruptcy, Collection and Foreclosure, Commercial Lending, Commercial Loans and Leases

This article is Part Two in a seven-part series on how to structure sales and what to do when your customer fails to pay. You can find Part One of this series here: Structuring Sales to Ensure Payment. Please subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the box on the left, or check back weekly for additional articles in the series. 

With the recent economic slowdown in many sectors and the parade of corrupt corporate executives on the evening news, corporate managers are more sensitive than ever to signs of troubled business practices and how those practices affect outstanding receivables.  Many distressed businesses display early warning signs of impending trouble, including some or all of the following:

  • Lack of a sound business plan- The company may not have a plan or may have expanded past the vision of it original business plan.
  • Ineffective management style- The management of a small company that has experienced rapid growth may not be able to delegate authority effectively. 
  • Poor lender/vendor relationships- The company may not respond quickly or fully to its vendor’s request for financial information or may actively hide information from its vendors.
  • Change in market conditions- The market for the company’s product may have changed, leaving the company with a shrinking market share and lower sales. The company’s technology or marketing may be obsolete to compete in the current marketplace (remember 8-track tapes?).
  • Over-diversification of products- The company may enter non-traditional markets too quickly in an effort to increase flagging sales but without the necessary resources or knowledge to

Continue Reading →