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Ohio “Stay at Home” order limits business operations to slow spread of COVID-19

The director of the Ohio Department of Health signed a “Stay at Home” order on March 22, 2020, calling on all Ohioans to stay at home or at their place of residence unless conducting or participating in essential activities, essential governmental functions, or essential businesses and operations. Our colleague, Adam Bennett, lays out what this order means for Ohio businesses.

Read the full post on the Employer Law Report Blog.…

COVID-19 and OSHA: Commonly asked questions

“The OSHA General Duty Clause requires all employers to provide a workplace free from known hazards. That includes known exposure to infectious diseases. So, OSHA does expect employers to take reasonable measures to protect workers from workplace exposure to COVID-19,” our colleague Mike Underwood explained expectations from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Read the full post on our Employer Law Report Blog.…

Association Health Plans—Proposed DOL Rules Create Potential Opportunity for Associations and Small Employers

Our colleagues at Porter Wright’s employee benefits blog recently described a proposed rule that may be of interest to community financial institutions: proposed rules of the Department of Labor that may make it easier to join with other similar organizations to purchase employee health insurance.  Saving expenses is the name of this game of course.  This is something to watch.  The post appears here.…

Tax Reform Will Affect Public Company Executive Compensation Arrangements and Related Proxy Statement Disclosures

While opinions on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) vary, one thing everyone can agree on is that it is a game changer in many areas of law and business. An example of that is how the Act affects executive compensation arrangements of publicly traded companies.  The Act has amended Internal Revenue Code Section 162(m) so that if a public company pays more than $1 million in compensation to a “covered employee” in 2018 or later, that company generally will not be able to deduct the amount over $1 million.  Amounts paid under agreements that were effective on or before November 2, 2017, however, may still be able to be deductible under a transition rule (assuming that the agreements are not materially modified).  To manage the loss of this deduction, public companies should consider taking the following actions with respect to their executive compensation plans.

  1. Reevaluate the design and administration of their plans.
  2. Implement measures to track covered employees because once an executive is a covered employee under Code Section 162(m), that person remains a covered employee forever (including after termination of service and even after he or she is deceased).
  3. Encourage covered employees to consider deferring larger
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