Banking & Finance Law Report

Archives: Other Articles

Subscribe to Other Articles RSS Feed

Ohio irrevocable trusts – Respite for trustees? Proposed legislation establishes optional process for extra-judicial claim resolution

An advantage of an inter vivos revocable trust, which becomes irrevocable upon the settlor’s death, is that the trust typically avoids all probate court filings. However, the lack of filings with the probate court can also be a double-edged sword for trustees who wish for a swift absolution of all claims associated with an irrevocable trust’s administration in Ohio.

The Ohio State Bar Association (OSBA) recently approved a policy that will advocate for a change in Ohio law to provide finality outside of probate administrations. This proposed legislation should be of great interest to institutional trustees in the state.

My colleagues David Bloomfield and Elizabeth Arentz explain in this Porter Wright Law Alert.

Drop your pencils: The PPP Flexibility Act is here

Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) borrowers across the nation have struggled to meet the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) guidelines, with many resorting to new and creative payroll expenditures to meet spending minimums and qualify for full forgiveness of the loan. On June 3, 2020, the U.S. Senate passed House Bill 7010, the “Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act of 2020”, which was promptly signed by the president the following day.  My colleague Cat Rice explains the PPP Flexbility Act in this Porter Wright Law Alert.…

Workplace exposure to COVID-19: Can employers be liable?

As COVID-19 cases continue to mount nationwide, so have lawsuits relating to fallout from the virus. On April 6, 2020, in one of the first COVID-19-related lawsuits of its kind, the estate of an Illinois Walmart Supercenter employee sued Walmart and the premises owner for wrongful death in Toney Evans v. Walmart, Inc., et al. My colleague Brodie Butland details the lawsuit in this Employer Law Report blog.…

Association Health Plans—Proposed DOL Rules Create Potential Opportunity for Associations and Small Employers

Our colleagues at Porter Wright’s employee benefits blog recently described a proposed rule that may be of interest to community financial institutions: proposed rules of the Department of Labor that may make it easier to join with other similar organizations to purchase employee health insurance.  Saving expenses is the name of this game of course.  This is something to watch.  The post appears here.…

Tax Reform Will Affect Public Company Executive Compensation Arrangements and Related Proxy Statement Disclosures

While opinions on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) vary, one thing everyone can agree on is that it is a game changer in many areas of law and business. An example of that is how the Act affects executive compensation arrangements of publicly traded companies.  The Act has amended Internal Revenue Code Section 162(m) so that if a public company pays more than $1 million in compensation to a “covered employee” in 2018 or later, that company generally will not be able to deduct the amount over $1 million.  Amounts paid under agreements that were effective on or before November 2, 2017, however, may still be able to be deductible under a transition rule (assuming that the agreements are not materially modified).  To manage the loss of this deduction, public companies should consider taking the following actions with respect to their executive compensation plans.

  1. Reevaluate the design and administration of their plans.
  2. Implement measures to track covered employees because once an executive is a covered employee under Code Section 162(m), that person remains a covered employee forever (including after termination of service and even after he or she is deceased).
  3. Encourage covered employees to consider deferring larger
LexBlog