Commercial leases often lack leasehold financing provisions despite the significant impact such provisions can have on the business dealings of the tenant during the term of the lease.

Long-term, creditworthy tenants, those who have value in their leaseholds such as restaurants and hotels, are often prime candidates for leasehold financing. A leasehold mortgage is very similar to a regular mortgage, except that, if a default occurs the holder of a leasehold mortgage has the right to foreclose not by conducting a sale of the building, but instead by taking over as the tenant under the lease. Usually a leasehold mortgage also includes a pledge of the tenant’s personal property on the leased premises, and by foreclosing the leasehold mortgage, the mortgage holder also takes title to the personal property in the leased premises. Because giving a leasehold mortgage does not require the mortgagor to own the real property it mortgages, leasehold financing allows businesses that rent space, and rather than own property, to obtain financing for their businesses.

Many businesses eligible for leasehold mortgages cannot reap the benefits of such arrangements due to restrictions in their leases on leasehold financing. Many commercial leases contain a general prohibition on any and …