Every business owner must make a decision regarding what he or she will do with the business. If no family member is able or willing to assume ownership, an increasingly popular succession planning strategy has been to sell the business to an employee stock ownership plan (“ESOP”).  ESOPs are popular in part because of the tax advantages they provide to the selling business owner, the company, and the employees.  Smaller businesses who have considered adopting an ESOP, however, sometimes have faced challenges securing financing on acceptable terms.  That could occur if the business’s assets (both tangible and intangible) did not provide sufficient collateral.  Further, the Small Business Administration (the “SBA”) 7(a) Loan Guaranty Program often was of little help because Section 7(a) of the Small Business Act did not reflect modern ESOP loan practices.

The SBA hurdle just became easier to overcome with the Main Street Employee Ownership Act (the “Act”), which was signed into law as part of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act. The Act should improve SBA lending to ESOPs in the following ways:…